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Keio University 150th Anniversary International Symposium “150 Years of Keio University: Retrospect and Prospect”

Update:Aug. 04, 2009
Professor Agawa delivers an opening speech
Professor Agawa delivers an opening speech
Professor Alan MacFarlane gives a lecture on Fukuzawa
Professor Alan MacFarlane gives a lecture on Fukuzawa
Special Exhibit
Special Exhibit
Special Exhibit
Special Exhibit

On July 22, Keio University 150th Anniversary International Symposium “150 Years of Keio University: Retrospect and Prospect” was held at the British Library in London. This event was co-hosted by Keio University and the British Library, sponsored by Japan Airlines Corporation and Bernard Quaritch Ltd., and was held with the assistance of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and the Japan Foundation. The symposium was open to the public and was attended by over 100 people, including invited guests from Keio’s partner institutions in the UK and Europe, and the Mita Kai (Keio Alumni Association).

Professor Emeritus, Toshiyuki Takamiya, who has been conducting collaborative research with the British Library through the HUMI (Humanities Media Interface) Project, was the Master of Ceremonies and also led the team planning the event.

The symposium began with welcome speeches by Professor Naoyuki Agawa, Vice President for International Collaboration and Education, and representatives from the British Library. The symposium’s two main lectures were given by Professor Alan MacFarlane from King’s College, University of Cambridge, titled “Fukuzawa Yukichi and the Making of the Modern World” and former Vice President, Professor Sakamoto from the Faculty of Economics, titled “The Legacy of Fukuzawa and the Future of Keio”. Following was a special exhibition and talk on the British Library’s collection of books relating to Fukuzawa and other documents from the early days of Japan-UK relations.

Keio University’s International Adviser and former Master of Downing College, University of Cambridge, Professor Peter Mathias, closed the symposium by giving warm encouragement to Keio as it enters the next stage of its history.

Before the symposium began, a minute’s silence was observed to remember Dr Carmen Blacker, a scholar of Japanese studies from the University of Cambridge. Dr Blacker, who passed away on July 13, 2009, was a pioneer of studies on Fukuzawa and had a strong connection with Keio University.

This symposium which was a great success, served to further strengthen the relationship between Keio University and the British Library who already share a long history of research exchange.